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Emerging Crops

Emerging CropsChanges in the marketplace are marked by consumer demand for new, local, high quality foods beverages and other plant products. The growth in craft beverage, local foods and hemp are all powered by crop production on New York State farms. Harvest NY's Emerging Crops program explores the potential for new crops -- industrial hemp, hops and more -- in New York State. The Emerging Crops program supports the growth and expansion of industrial hemp, hops and grains for the local craft beverage or bakery industry, and other emerging markets in NYS. Our program seeks to maximize the economic potential for current NY-grown crops, including berries, through education on best management practices and season extension techniques. Harvest NY Emerging Crop Specialists work directly with farmers on production issues by conducting industry-wide research and development projects.



EMERGING CROPS CATEGORIES




Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners

Anya Osatuke, WNY Berry Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: March 8, 2022
Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners

The production of strawberry plants is challenging due to the rigorous sanitation needs that must be met, especially in field propagation settings, but also in greenhouse settings. To add to that, growers in New York may find it more difficult to obtain their preferred strawberry varieties in the coming years, as fewer nurseries are propagating strawberries. The solution: strawberry plug plants propagated from runners in a controlled environment such as a greenhouse or high tunnel. Plug production of rarer varieties that do well in New York State will fetch a higher price than dormant bare-root plants due to the higher cost of production and lower availability in the Northeast, especially if plants are available in August. This article only discusses production and marketing potential of plug plants because successful field production of bare-root strawberries is very difficult to achieve without the use of highly restricted soil fumigants. 


Pawpaws in NY: A Guide on How to Grow and Care for Pawpaws

Anya Osatuke, WNY Berry Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: October 5, 2021
Pawpaws in NY: A Guide on How to Grow and Care for Pawpaws

The pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a fruiting tree native to the eastern United States, growing from the Florida lowlands up to the Southern Tier in New York. It is believed that the pawpaw's range is as large as it is because Indigenous Peoples cultivated this tree. Pawpaws have great value as a food crop. They contain 7 of the 9 essential amino acids and are an excellent source of iron and manganese. 

The pawpaw patch in Lansing has attracted much interest due to the large, flavorful fruits and strong trees that grow there. Pawpaw trees grow up to about 35 feet tall. Pawpaws need around 5 to 6 years to begin growing fruits and flowers. Their maroon-colored flowers open between March and May, and fruit become ripe from August through October. Compared to pawpaws that grow in the wild in the Midwest, some of the fruits of the Lansing pawpaws can be 2 - 5 times larger. 

This guide, written by Anya Osatuke, Berry Specialist with CCE Harvest NY, Sean Dembrosky of Edible Acres in Trumansburg, NY, and Marvin Pritts of Cornell University, shares practical information on how to grow and care for pawpaws, based on conversations with growers and researchers in New York State and the information provided by the references cited. 


Cornell Recommendations for U-Pick Operational Changes due to COVID-19

Esther Kibbe, WNY Berry Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: April 29, 2020
Cornell Recommendations for U-Pick Operational Changes due to COVID-19

Many growers who allow customers to come and pick their own vegetables and fruits have been concerned about how that will work in this time of social distancing and closed businesses. At this time, the state has not prohibited U-Pick or on-farm sales. Cornell has just released a document outlining best practices and ideas for growers who choose to allow the public on their farms. 


Managing Blueberry Stem Gall Wasp in New York

Esther Kibbe, WNY Berry Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: February 5, 2020
Managing Blueberry Stem Gall Wasp in New York

In the past few months, several growers across WNY have observed stem galls in their blueberry fields. While somewhat uncommon, the blueberry stem gall wasp (Hemadas nubilipennis) is an insect native to Eastern North America. It is found in both low and high bush blueberry plants in the wild and in cultivated fields. In some regions and varieties the wasp can multiply to high levels, causing economic injury in commercial fields. 


Edible Hemp Foliar Sampling Project 2018

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist, Team Leader
Harvest New York

Last Modified: January 7, 2019
Edible Hemp Foliar Sampling Project 2018

Hemp, a multi-use crop that has been cultivated for centuries, is increasingly cultivated in New York. 'Industrial hemp' is a non-intoxicant version of Cannabis sativa with potential use as fiber, grain or processed consumer products. Hemp is a controlled substance, regulated by the US Drug Enforcement Agency. New York is one of the states with a sanctioned program to study growth, cultivation and marketing of the crop. 

In 2018 CCE worked with two farms in Central and Northern New York to begin to understand nutrient dynamics in the production of edible hemp. The end product may be a microgreen for salad style consumption, juice or smoothies; or formulated into other edible products. Although we initially began to work with microgreens, farmers have found interest in edible portions of later stages of crop growth too. In both situations the crop was grown inside a greenhouse; one in mineral soil, the other in potting soil.




Upcoming Events

Como Cultivar Hongos Comestibles (How to Grow Edible Mushrooms)

July 16, 2022
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Bronx, NY

This mushroom workshop will be taught in Spanish.

Acomparie a los equipos de Cornell Co-op Extension y New York Restoration Project con las facilitadoras Cecilia, Marina, y Yolanda para aprender tres formas diferentes de cultivar hongos comestibles en su jardin. 
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CRAFT Urban Ag IPM Workshop

July 19, 2022
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Brooklyn, NY

Experts from the NYS IPM Program will answer questions about beneficial insects and how to attract them to your urban farm or garden. We will also be providing some background on the Conservation Biocontrol project that is now in its second year, introducing our Cornell Cooperative Extension summer interns and providing a brief tour of Oko Farms.
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Announcements

Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners

The production of strawberry plants is challenging due to the rigorous sanitation needs that must be met, especially in field propagation settings, but also in greenhouse settings. To add to that, growers in New York may find it more difficult to obtain their preferred strawberry varieties in the coming years, as fewer nurseries are propagating strawberries. The solution: strawberry plug plants propagated from runners in a controlled environment such as a greenhouse or high tunnel.

Plug production of rarer varieties that do well in New York State will fetch a higher price than dormant bare-root plants due to the higher cost of production and lower availability in the Northeast, especially if plants are available in August.
Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners, written by Anya Osatuke of CCE Harvest NY and Brad Bergefurd of The Ohio State University, only discusses production and marketing potential of plug plants because successful field production of bare-root strawberries is very difficult to achieve without the use of highly restricted soil fumigants. 

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