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Farm-Based Beverages

Farm-Based BeveragesSince 2012, New York State has supported the craft beverage industry by working to cut red tape, increase demand for locally grown farm products, and expand industry-related tourism and economic development. With a growing demand for locally grown inputs, many types of new markets have developed and continue to develop for NY's farmers. In response to this growth, research and education efforts are increasing as members of the farm-based beverage supply chains continues to expand. Harvest NY specialists strive to identify the challenges within these growing markets and work with researchers, production specialists, industry, and policy makers to overcome these barriers.

FARM-BASED BEVERAGES CATEGORIES




Insuring Malting Barley in New York Factsheet (2019)

Last Modified: May 21, 2019
Insuring Malting Barley in New York Factsheet (2019)

Are you a malting barley grower considering crop insurance? This factsheet provides on the crop insurance policies, where in New York you can insure malting barley, and important deadlines to keep in mind.


Malting Barley: Keys to Successful Production in New York State

Last Modified: May 24, 2018
Malting Barley: Keys to Successful Production in New York State

This comprehensive guide, developed by College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University faculty and Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialists, provides 10 essential malting barley production recommendations for growers in New York State.


Hard Cider Supply Chain Analysis

Lindsey Pashow, Ag Business Development & Marketing Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: March 23, 2018
Hard Cider Supply Chain Analysis

Hard cider is a fast-growing craft beverage industry in New York, in part due to the passage of the Farm Cider Law in 2013, which affords licensees certain benefits, but requires the use of New York-grown agricultural products. With increasing market demand for hard cider variety apples, there may be challenges with sourcing specialty cider apples, such as bittersharps, bittersweets and heirloom dual purpose (dessert/cider).  

NYS Brewery Supply Chain Analysis, v2

Cheryl Bilinski, Local Food Systems Specialist, Farm to School Lead
Harvest New York

Last Modified: February 8, 2018
NYS Brewery Supply Chain Analysis, v2

The NYS craft beer industry has experienced significant growth in the past few years due, in part, to the passage of the Farm Brewery Law, which grants breweries that choose to operate under this license certain benefits, but also requires the purchase of an increasing percentage of NYS grown ingredients between 2013 and 2024. In response to this emerging market opportunity, New York State Empire State Development, New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Hartwick Center for Craft Food and Beverage, and the NYS Brewers Association have been busy working with growers, malt house operators and breweries on a number of different research, technical assistance and programmatic efforts to ensure the continued growth and viability of this nascent, yet potentially significant economic driver for NYS.

To support this industry, Cornell Cooperative Extension Harvest NY administrated round one of market surveys in 2015 and administered a second round of surveys to growers, malt house operators and breweries in the spring of 2017. The information contained within this report includes an analysis of the survey data received in the second round of survey administration.


Starting a Winery in Northern New York: Considerations and Costs

Lindsey Pashow, Ag Business Development & Marketing Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: December 19, 2017
Starting a Winery in Northern New York: Considerations and Costs

Are you interested in starting a winery in Northern New York? CCE Harvest New York has put together a report and interactive Excel spreadsheets on Starting a Winery in Northern New York: Winery Establishment Considerations and Costs.


Economics of Malting Barley Production

Cheryl Bilinski, Local Food Systems Specialist, Farm to School Lead
Harvest New York

Last Modified: March 31, 2017
Economics of Malting Barley Production

John Hanchar of CCE Northwest NY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops team worked with specialists, producers and others in the malting barley industry to develop enterprise budgets under various conditions -- spring vs. winter varieties, varying tillage practices, standard vs. intensive management, and others. Enterprise budgets comprise: value of production, income; costs of production (variable and fixed inputs); and returns, for example, return above variable costs, and return above total costs.


Malting Barley Alternative Markets

Cheryl Bilinski, Local Food Systems Specialist, Farm to School Lead
Harvest New York

Last Modified: March 27, 2017
Malting Barley Alternative Markets

What will you do if the malting barley you've grown does not meet the specs of your maltster? Plan ahead for an alternative market for rejected barley. This can help minimize economic losses if the crop is rejected based on grain quality. Using barley as an animal feed as a portion of finishing rations for beef cattle is a good option as well as including it in a dairy cow ration -- barley is a comparable substitute for corn.

This flyer will provide information about market opportunities for rejected barley and potential buyers.


Quality Testing Available through Hartwick College

Elizabeth Newbold, Local Food Distribution & Marketing Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: June 28, 2016
Quality Testing Available through Hartwick College

Hartwick College Center for Craft Food and Beverage now provides quality testing services in New York. The testing lab provides convenient, reliable and affordable barley quality, beer quality, hop quality, and malt quality testing.


Cornell Malting Barley Resources -- Breeding Program, Variety Trials, Research

Elizabeth Newbold, Local Food Distribution & Marketing Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: April 4, 2016
Cornell Malting Barley Resources -- Breeding Program, Variety Trials, Research

Cornell University has started a malting barley breeding program, is conducting variety trials across the state, and is engaged in research to reduce disease and mycotoxin contamination.  


NYS Brewery Supply Chain Analysis, v1, 2016

Elizabeth Newbold, Local Food Distribution & Marketing Specialist
Harvest New York

Last Modified: February 19, 2016
NYS Brewery Supply Chain Analysis, v1, 2016

Following the passage of New York's Farm Brewery Law in 2013, new markets developed for malting barley farmers, malt house operations and farm brewers. As these new markets developed, grain quality, quantity and price projections for the industry were made based on the best available information at the time. However, it was clear that a more comprehensive market analysis was needed in order to best support this growing industry. This report summarizes the data gathered through that analysis.  


New York Malt Houses Purchasing Grains

Last Modified: January 15, 2016
New York Malt Houses Purchasing Grains

Interested in growing malting barley? Here are the contacts for all the active malt houses in New York.




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Announcements

New Ag Climate Factsheet Released

The intersection of agricultural production and greenhouse gases is gathering increasing attention. This is an opportune time to consider how vegetable production interacts with carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions, and how using cover crops may alter this picture.

The factsheet, Greenhouse Gases and Soil Organic Carbon in Vegetable Production and the Role of Cover Crops, written by Zach Spangler, Ag Climate Resiliency Specialist with CCE Harvest NY, and Elizabeth Buck, Fresh Market Vegetable Specialist, CCE Cornell Vegetable Program, discusses:
  • Sequestration of atmospheric carbon in agricultural soils as soil organic carbon (SOC). Is vegetable production impacting SOC?
  • Net greenhouse gas emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4) from the soil.
  • Impact of cover crops on soil organic carbon, nitrous oxide emissions, and other GHG emissions.


The NY Food Hub Collaborative Takes Root!

Cornell Cooperative Extension has received a USDA Regional Food Systems Partnership Planning and Development grant for the NY Food Hub Collaborative. This is a 2-year project.

The NY Food Hub Collaborative brings together 29 local food system stakeholders representing 21 organizations to realize the long-term goal of improving the economic viability of mid-tier value chain partners targeting local markets by improving efficiencies, maximizing profits, and increasing demand for NY food products. Three objectives guide the project tea toward that goal:

1. Establish a Collaborative of interdependent food hubs designed to work collaboratively to efficiently, affordably, and effectively market NY food products to institutional markets.

2. Identify the potential for small, mid-size, and socially disadvantaged producers to be competitive in state agency and institutional contracts.

3. Develop strategic business relationships between mid-tier value chain partners including food hubs, producers, processors, distributors, and markets that emphasize organizational interdependence, trust, and transparency and equitably distribute responsibilities and rewards.

Objectives will be met through strategic planning amongst Collaborative partners, virtual field trips to learn best practices from national partners, business-to-business development opportunities, producer and market partner training, and a series of outputs. Outputs include an interactive local food system asset map, a procurement guide on selling NY food products to various institutional markets, an analysis of existing procurement policies across institutions and recommendations for improvement, market analyses of key institutional market partners, a NY Collaborative product guide, and an implementation plan that provides a framework to operationalize the NY Food Hub Collaborative.

Project Partners:

  • Cornell Cooperative Extension Harvest NY
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension Broome, Oneida, Essex, and Saratoga Counties
  • Farm Fare
  • Syracuse University
  • Upstate Growers & Packers
  • Eden Valley Growers
  • Capital Roots
  • Farm Fresh First
  • 607CSA
  • Hub on the Hill
  • Headwater Food Hub
  • Syracuse Onondaga Food Systems Alliance
  • Hudson Valley Agribusiness Development Corp.
  • Center for Agriculture Development and Entrepreneurship
  • NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets
  • Buffalo City School District
  • Syracuse City School District
  • NYC Citywide Administrative Services
Additional project partners will be identified as the project takes root. If you're interested in learning more or getting involved, please reach out to Project Director, Cheryl Bilinski, cbt32@cornell.edu.



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