Farm-Based Beverages    Local Foods    Dairy Food Processing    Urban Agriculture    Emerging Crops    COVID-19
  Harvest New York Facebook Page Harvest NY Twitter

Dairy Food Processing

Dairy Food ProcessingNew York State is #1 in the production of yogurt, sour cream and cottage cheese and is also #4 in total cheese production. There has been tremendous growth in the numbers of companies coming to New York State to manufacture dairy products as a result of the high quality milk supply, proximity to markets and state-level and extension support that is given to the dairy manufacturing industry.

Dairy Food Manufacturing also employs well over 8,000 people in New York State. Additionally, for every job created by dairy food manufacturers, an additional 5.6 jobs are created indirectly (i.e. through vendors, contractors, et cetra). With the growth and projected growth in dairy foods manufacturing, developing a workforce is essential to sustainability. The Dairy Foods Processing Specialists works with dairy plants, regulatory agencies, workforce development agencies and suppliers to educate a future workforce for the dairy foods manufacturing industry.

The Dairy Foods Processing Specialists also work with start-up companies. Harvest New York connects companies with technical and business resources and helps companies understand key considerations before entering the dairy business. These include providing insight into regulatory requirements, plant operations, understanding market dynamics, and emerging market trends.






Cornell's Dairy Foods Extension Team

Last Modified: May 24, 2021
Cornell's Dairy Foods Extension Team

Dairy Processing Specialists work directly with Cornell's campus-based Dairy Foods Extension team. This collaboration fosters direct communication with industry stakeholders and keeps Cornell's dairy research team aware of current and relevant industry needs.


Top 3 Considerations for Starting a Value-Added Dairy Business

Last Modified: February 28, 2018
Top 3 Considerations for Starting a Value-Added Dairy Business

One of the first questions often asked when an individual is considering adding value to their milk is, "How much capital investment it is going to take to start a project like this?" While this is a critical question when starting a business, many people do not consider the other hidden costs associated with actually operating a value-added dairy business. Food safety is a topic that new processors don't typically think about in the beginning. Here are our top 3 things to consider when looking into value-added dairy processing.


New York Dairy Industry Infographic

Last Modified: February 1, 2018
New York Dairy Industry Infographic

New York's dairy industry is impressive! This infographic shows shares info on New York's national production rankings, dairy processing plants, economic impact of the industry in the state, and much more!




Upcoming Events

Como Cultivar Hongos Comestibles (How to Grow Edible Mushrooms)

July 16, 2022
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Bronx, NY

This mushroom workshop will be taught in Spanish.

Acomparie a los equipos de Cornell Co-op Extension y New York Restoration Project con las facilitadoras Cecilia, Marina, y Yolanda para aprender tres formas diferentes de cultivar hongos comestibles en su jardin. 
view details

CRAFT Urban Ag IPM Workshop

July 19, 2022
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Brooklyn, NY

Experts from the NYS IPM Program will answer questions about beneficial insects and how to attract them to your urban farm or garden. We will also be providing some background on the Conservation Biocontrol project that is now in its second year, introducing our Cornell Cooperative Extension summer interns and providing a brief tour of Oko Farms.
view details

Announcements

Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners

The production of strawberry plants is challenging due to the rigorous sanitation needs that must be met, especially in field propagation settings, but also in greenhouse settings. To add to that, growers in New York may find it more difficult to obtain their preferred strawberry varieties in the coming years, as fewer nurseries are propagating strawberries. The solution: strawberry plug plants propagated from runners in a controlled environment such as a greenhouse or high tunnel.

Plug production of rarer varieties that do well in New York State will fetch a higher price than dormant bare-root plants due to the higher cost of production and lower availability in the Northeast, especially if plants are available in August.
Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners, written by Anya Osatuke of CCE Harvest NY and Brad Bergefurd of The Ohio State University, only discusses production and marketing potential of plug plants because successful field production of bare-root strawberries is very difficult to achieve without the use of highly restricted soil fumigants. 

TESTIMONIALS  |  RESOURCES  |  SITE MAP