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Dairy Food Processing

Dairy Food ProcessingNew York State is #1 in the production of yogurt, sour cream and cottage cheese and is also #4 in total cheese production. There has been tremendous growth in the numbers of companies coming to New York State to manufacture dairy products as a result of the high quality milk supply, proximity to markets and state-level and extension support that is given to the dairy manufacturing industry.

Dairy Food Manufacturing also employs well over 8,000 people in New York State. Additionally, for every job created by dairy food manufacturers, an additional 5.6 jobs are created indirectly (i.e. through vendors, contractors, et cetra). With the growth and projected growth in dairy foods manufacturing, developing a workforce is essential to sustainability. The Dairy Foods Processing Specialists works with dairy plants, regulatory agencies, workforce development agencies and suppliers to educate a future workforce for the dairy foods manufacturing industry.

The Dairy Foods Processing Specialists also work with start-up companies. Harvest New York connects companies with technical and business resources and helps companies understand key considerations before entering the dairy business. These include providing insight into regulatory requirements, plant operations, understanding market dynamics, and emerging market trends.





Cornell's Dairy Foods Extension Team

Last Modified: May 24, 2021
Cornell's Dairy Foods Extension Team

Dairy Processing Specialists work directly with Cornell's campus-based Dairy Foods Extension team. This collaboration fosters direct communication with industry stakeholders and keeps Cornell's dairy research team aware of current and relevant industry needs.


Top 3 Considerations for Starting a Value-Added Dairy Business

Last Modified: February 28, 2018
Top 3 Considerations for Starting a Value-Added Dairy Business

One of the first questions often asked when an individual is considering adding value to their milk is, "How much capital investment it is going to take to start a project like this?" While this is a critical question when starting a business, many people do not consider the other hidden costs associated with actually operating a value-added dairy business. Food safety is a topic that new processors don't typically think about in the beginning. Here are our top 3 things to consider when looking into value-added dairy processing.


New York Dairy Industry Infographic

Last Modified: February 1, 2018
New York Dairy Industry Infographic

New York's dairy industry is impressive! This infographic shows shares info on New York's national production rankings, dairy processing plants, economic impact of the industry in the state, and much more!




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Announcements

New Ag Climate Factsheet Released

The intersection of agricultural production and greenhouse gases is gathering increasing attention. This is an opportune time to consider how vegetable production interacts with carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions, and how using cover crops may alter this picture.

The factsheet, Greenhouse Gases and Soil Organic Carbon in Vegetable Production and the Role of Cover Crops, written by Zach Spangler, Ag Climate Resiliency Specialist with CCE Harvest NY, and Elizabeth Buck, Fresh Market Vegetable Specialist, CCE Cornell Vegetable Program, discusses:
  • Sequestration of atmospheric carbon in agricultural soils as soil organic carbon (SOC). Is vegetable production impacting SOC?
  • Net greenhouse gas emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4) from the soil.
  • Impact of cover crops on soil organic carbon, nitrous oxide emissions, and other GHG emissions.


The NY Food Hub Collaborative Takes Root!

Cornell Cooperative Extension has received a USDA Regional Food Systems Partnership Planning and Development grant for the NY Food Hub Collaborative. This is a 2-year project.

The NY Food Hub Collaborative brings together 29 local food system stakeholders representing 21 organizations to realize the long-term goal of improving the economic viability of mid-tier value chain partners targeting local markets by improving efficiencies, maximizing profits, and increasing demand for NY food products. Three objectives guide the project tea toward that goal:

1. Establish a Collaborative of interdependent food hubs designed to work collaboratively to efficiently, affordably, and effectively market NY food products to institutional markets.

2. Identify the potential for small, mid-size, and socially disadvantaged producers to be competitive in state agency and institutional contracts.

3. Develop strategic business relationships between mid-tier value chain partners including food hubs, producers, processors, distributors, and markets that emphasize organizational interdependence, trust, and transparency and equitably distribute responsibilities and rewards.

Objectives will be met through strategic planning amongst Collaborative partners, virtual field trips to learn best practices from national partners, business-to-business development opportunities, producer and market partner training, and a series of outputs. Outputs include an interactive local food system asset map, a procurement guide on selling NY food products to various institutional markets, an analysis of existing procurement policies across institutions and recommendations for improvement, market analyses of key institutional market partners, a NY Collaborative product guide, and an implementation plan that provides a framework to operationalize the NY Food Hub Collaborative.

Project Partners:

  • Cornell Cooperative Extension Harvest NY
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension Broome, Oneida, Essex, and Saratoga Counties
  • Farm Fare
  • Syracuse University
  • Upstate Growers & Packers
  • Eden Valley Growers
  • Capital Roots
  • Farm Fresh First
  • 607CSA
  • Hub on the Hill
  • Headwater Food Hub
  • Syracuse Onondaga Food Systems Alliance
  • Hudson Valley Agribusiness Development Corp.
  • Center for Agriculture Development and Entrepreneurship
  • NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets
  • Buffalo City School District
  • Syracuse City School District
  • NYC Citywide Administrative Services
Additional project partners will be identified as the project takes root. If you're interested in learning more or getting involved, please reach out to Project Director, Cheryl Bilinski, cbt32@cornell.edu.



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